Department of Health   

                

Communicable Diseases

       

          

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Communicable Diseases

MRSA

About Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

MRSA is a type of bacterial staph infection resistant to many antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat. Staph infections, including MRSA, occur most often among persons in hospitals and healthcare facilities with weakened immune systems. However, more recently, these infections are being acquired by persons not recently hospitalized or having undergone medical procedures.

Now in the community setting, CA-MRSA (Community-Associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) infections are spreading through prisons, gyms and locker rooms often due to poor hygiene practices, creating an entry route for infection.

MRSA Infection Risk Factors:

  • Close skin-to-skin contact with someone with MRSA infection
  • Openings in the skin such as cuts or abrasions
  • Contact with surfaces and items that have Staph bacteria on them
  • Crowded living conditions
  • Poor hygiene

As these bacteria can be carried by healthy people, living on their skin or in their noses, the most important prevention measure is to practice good hygiene by washing your hands with soap and water often.

MRSA Infection Prevention:

  • Keep your hands clean by washing thoroughly with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Keep cuts and scrapes clean and covered with a bandage until healed
  • Avoid contact with other people’s wounds or bandages
  • Avoid sharing personal items such as towels or razors

Practicing good hygiene by washing your hands with soap and water is the best way to protect yourself and others.

MRSA Infection Symptoms:

Symptoms of Staph or MRSA infections may manifest as skin infections, such as pimples and boils that can be red, swollen, painful, or have pus or other drainage and occur in otherwise healthy people.

See your healthcare provider if you think you may have a staph or MRSA infection.

Links to Resources:

National:

Educational Materials and Resources

Information Sheet for Patients with MRSA

Information about CA-MRSA for Clinicians

 

State:

Fact Sheet:

MRSA FAQs

 

 

 

 

Department   of   Health:
140 County Highway 33W
Suite #3

Cooperstown, NY 13326

Phone: 607.547.4230
Fax: 607.547.4385

After Hours : 607-547-1697

Office Hours:      9:00-5:00

Summer Hours:  9:00-4:00     

                          (July - August)

Communicable Disease

Coordinator

Theresa Oellrich RN

e-mail:

oellricht@otsegocounty.com

Margaret Benjamin RN

e-mail:

benjaminm@otsegocounty.com